Meet the Candidate

Andrea’s Story


“In this profound moment of reckoning for our country and our city, as people rise up to demand change, Boston needs leadership that not only understands, but has lived the systemic inequities facing our residents every day. I’m running for Mayor to be that leader, to confront racism head-on, eradicate inequities, and finally make Boston a City that works for everyone.”

 

As children growing up in Roxbury and the South End, Andrea and her twin brother Andre were inseparable, shouldering and surviving instability in their lives together from an early age. Both lost their mother in a car accident when they were only 8 months old, and their father was incarcerated for the first eight years of their lives. For those eight years, Andrea and her siblings grew up with relatives and in foster care, often in public housing and on food assistance. 

 


As children growing up in Roxbury and the South End, Andrea and her twin brother Andre were inseparable, shouldering and surviving instability in their lives together from an early age. Both lost their mother in a car accident when they were only 8 months old, and their father was incarcerated for the first eight years of their lives. For those eight years, Andrea and her siblings grew up with relatives and in foster care, often in public housing and on food assistance. 

 


But as they grew older, Andrea and Andre’s lives went in very different directions. While Andrea’s academic gifts were recognized – putting her on a path to Boston Latin School, Princeton University, and a promising legal career – Andre’s were not. Like too many young Black men in our society, Andre was over-disciplined and under-supported by adults who failed to recognize his potential. He cycled in and out of the criminal justice system and died at age 29 while awaiting trial. Andrea’s family has never been given a full accounting of Andre’s death.


But as they grew older, Andrea and Andre’s lives went in very different directions. While Andrea’s academic gifts were recognized – putting her on a path to Boston Latin School, Princeton University, and a promising legal career – Andre’s were not. Like too many young Black men in our society, Andre was over-disciplined and under-supported by adults who failed to recognize his potential. He cycled in and out of the criminal justice system and died at age 29 while awaiting trial. Andrea’s family has never been given a full accounting of Andre’s death.


Andrea’s career has been driven by the pain of Andre’s loss and a fundamental question: How can two twins born and raised in Boston have such different life outcomes?


Andrea’s career has been driven by the pain of Andre’s loss and a fundamental question: How can two twins born and raised in Boston have such different life outcomes?


The truth is that Boston has always been a city divided by access to opportunity. Andrea understands that we cannot claim to be a resilient city if only some people and communities have access to what they need to thrive. For her entire adult life, Andrea has stood up against inequity in our City and fought for change by bringing people together. Our neighborhoods must be connected and leaders must work in partnership with residents to create a future where every Bostonian has access to opportunity, resources, and a seat at the decision-making table.


The truth is that Boston has always been a city divided by access to opportunity. Andrea understands that we cannot claim to be a resilient city if only some people and communities have access to what they need to thrive. For her entire adult life, Andrea has stood up against inequity in our City and fought for change by bringing people together. Our neighborhoods must be connected and leaders must work in partnership with residents to create a future where every Bostonian has access to opportunity, resources, and a seat at the decision-making table.


As a young lawyer, she knew how the school-to-prison pipeline criminalizes young Black and Brown students and represented parents and students in discipline hearings. Later, she went on to serve as Deputy Legal Counsel in Governor Deval Patrick’s administration, working to create more equitable systems and deliver progressive change to communities across the Commonwealth. Along the way, she met her husband Matt. Today, they’re raising their two sons, Alexander and Aiden, in Mattapan.


As a young lawyer, she knew how the school-to-prison pipeline criminalizes young Black and Brown students and represented parents and students in discipline hearings. Later, she went on to serve as Deputy Legal Counsel in Governor Deval Patrick’s administration, working to create more equitable systems and deliver progressive change to communities across the Commonwealth. Along the way, she met her husband Matt. Today, they’re raising their two sons, Alexander and Aiden, in Mattapan.


In 2015, Andrea challenged a 32-year incumbent to represent Mattapan, Dorchester, and parts of Jamaica Plain and Roslindale on the City Council. Nobody in the political establishment gave her a chance. But she built a community-focused movement and she shocked those in power, ushering in a new generation of leadership for her community. 


In 2015, Andrea challenged a 32-year incumbent to represent Mattapan, Dorchester, and parts of Jamaica Plain and Roslindale on the City Council. Nobody in the political establishment gave her a chance. But she built a community-focused movement and she shocked those in power, ushering in a new generation of leadership for her community. 


Since then, Andrea has been a leader for equity, justice, and opportunity for all in Boston. As the first Black woman to serve as Boston City Council President, she championed an agenda that put racial equity at the top of Boston’s priority list. For years, she’s led the fight to reform our police and criminal legal systems and pushed our City and school leaders to act urgently to provide a quality public education to every student.


Since then, Andrea has been a leader for equity, justice, and opportunity for all in Boston. As the first Black woman to serve as Boston City Council President, she championed an agenda that put racial equity at the top of Boston’s priority list. For years, she’s led the fight to reform our police and criminal legal systems and pushed our City and school leaders to act urgently to provide a quality public education to every student.


Now, Andrea is running for Mayor – because Boston can’t afford to wait any longer to move toward equity and justice for all. 


 

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